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MIT has been banned in leave-on applications since 2015, with rinse-on application also having been a effected by the more recent tightening of regulations by the European Commission.

And while the new, lower, limit for MIT in rinse-off applications (15ppm) does not necessarily mean that all brands are required to change their formulas, many are wishing to do so to protect themselves from consumer backlash. In addition in some formulations the new lower limit of MIT is ineffective and should be replaced.

But this removal of MIT presents a whole new problem for cosmetic and personal care brands, the MIT was there for a very good reason, and now needs to be replaced without a effecting the efficacy of the product.

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Chemlink's MIT removal guide in 3D
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